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Use journaling to promote relaxation and better sleep.
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Better Sleep: Day 5
Vanessa Keranovic
Watching Now
Better Sleep: Day 5
Better Sleep: Day 5
Vanessa Keranovic • 07:34

Writing in a journal provides a safe and private space for expressing your thoughts, feelings, and concerns. Through it, you can release any lingering stress, worries, or anxieties. Writing your thoughts down might help you gain perspective and a sense of clarity. Stress levels can be reduced and you can unwind before night with this act of self-expression and emotional release. Additionally, maintaining a journal may assist you in identifying the triggers or patterns that lead to your stress so you can develop effective coping techniques.

Including gratitude journaling in your evening ritual can help you develop a happy attitude and a sense of fulfillment. By thinking about the things you have to be thankful for, you turn your attention to the good things in your life. By encouraging emotions of happiness, gratitude, and general well-being, this practice helps balance out any unfavorable thoughts or worries. 

Journaling encourages self-reflection and self-awareness. These are two things necessary for growing as a person and having better sleep. Writing about your experiences, setbacks, and victories can teach you a lot about your thoughts, routines, and mental processes. By conducting some introspection, you might identify any recurring issues or pressures that might be affecting your ability to sleep. With this information, you may create strategies for dealing with and overcoming these challenges, promoting personal growth, and improving the sleeping environment.


View Transcript
[Vanessa Keranovic, Mindfulness Coach] Welcome to the last step of the course "Mindfulness for Better Sleep". Find a comfortable and a quiet place. Grab your pen and a journal and let's get started. First, we'll do some on-the-spot journaling combined with a breathing practice. This will help you have some more insight into your sleep and your evening routines. After that, you will be offered various journal prompts for your evening reflections that you can then jot down and come back to as the evening comes and you want to start journaling. So let's get started with the practice. If you haven't already, find a comfortable position, and have a pen and journal right next to you. Let's close our eyes and take a couple of deep breaths. You can count to five for every inhale and exhale so you can deepen your breath more intentionally. With every inhale, see if you can stretch up your spine and open up your chest a bit more. And with every exhale, relax further into the posture, release any resistance, and see if you can let go of any left tension. Counting to five for every inhale, and five for every exhale. And a couple of rounds of breath like this. Whenever the mind wanders, bring it back to your breath and start counting once again, five every inhale, five every exhale. And as you're starting to feel more grounded, allow your breath to flow naturally, still keeping your focus, your attention, onto your breath, but this time not trying to control it anymore, simply observing it. Wonderful. Okay, slowly open your eyes, grab your journal, open to a blank page, and write your first question. What does my evening routine currently look like? Is my evening routine an enjoyable ritual to me? What do I enjoy about it? What do I feel called to change or let go of? What do I want to bring into my evening routine? In what order do I want to do my evening routine activities? What is one thing I can do today that will help me create an evening ritual I'll really enjoy? Amazing. And if you need more time for your answers, come back to them and spend a bit more time with them, contemplate over them, and then write whatever feels most right and most natural to you. I wanna thank you once again for joining me on this course. I hope it was valuable for you and I hope you've learned something. I wanna thank you for giving me the opportunity to teach you more about mindfulness for better sleep. And I'll see you in some other course as well.

Watching Now
Better Sleep: Day 5
Better Sleep: Day 5
Vanessa Keranovic • 07:34

Writing in a journal provides a safe and private space for expressing your thoughts, feelings, and concerns. Through it, you can release any lingering stress, worries, or anxieties. Writing your thoughts down might help you gain perspective and a sense of clarity. Stress levels can be reduced and you can unwind before night with this act of self-expression and emotional release. Additionally, maintaining a journal may assist you in identifying the triggers or patterns that lead to your stress so you can develop effective coping techniques.

Including gratitude journaling in your evening ritual can help you develop a happy attitude and a sense of fulfillment. By thinking about the things you have to be thankful for, you turn your attention to the good things in your life. By encouraging emotions of happiness, gratitude, and general well-being, this practice helps balance out any unfavorable thoughts or worries. 

Journaling encourages self-reflection and self-awareness. These are two things necessary for growing as a person and having better sleep. Writing about your experiences, setbacks, and victories can teach you a lot about your thoughts, routines, and mental processes. By conducting some introspection, you might identify any recurring issues or pressures that might be affecting your ability to sleep. With this information, you may create strategies for dealing with and overcoming these challenges, promoting personal growth, and improving the sleeping environment.


View Transcript
[Vanessa Keranovic, Mindfulness Coach] Welcome to the last step of the course "Mindfulness for Better Sleep". Find a comfortable and a quiet place. Grab your pen and a journal and let's get started. First, we'll do some on-the-spot journaling combined with a breathing practice. This will help you have some more insight into your sleep and your evening routines. After that, you will be offered various journal prompts for your evening reflections that you can then jot down and come back to as the evening comes and you want to start journaling. So let's get started with the practice. If you haven't already, find a comfortable position, and have a pen and journal right next to you. Let's close our eyes and take a couple of deep breaths. You can count to five for every inhale and exhale so you can deepen your breath more intentionally. With every inhale, see if you can stretch up your spine and open up your chest a bit more. And with every exhale, relax further into the posture, release any resistance, and see if you can let go of any left tension. Counting to five for every inhale, and five for every exhale. And a couple of rounds of breath like this. Whenever the mind wanders, bring it back to your breath and start counting once again, five every inhale, five every exhale. And as you're starting to feel more grounded, allow your breath to flow naturally, still keeping your focus, your attention, onto your breath, but this time not trying to control it anymore, simply observing it. Wonderful. Okay, slowly open your eyes, grab your journal, open to a blank page, and write your first question. What does my evening routine currently look like? Is my evening routine an enjoyable ritual to me? What do I enjoy about it? What do I feel called to change or let go of? What do I want to bring into my evening routine? In what order do I want to do my evening routine activities? What is one thing I can do today that will help me create an evening ritual I'll really enjoy? Amazing. And if you need more time for your answers, come back to them and spend a bit more time with them, contemplate over them, and then write whatever feels most right and most natural to you. I wanna thank you once again for joining me on this course. I hope it was valuable for you and I hope you've learned something. I wanna thank you for giving me the opportunity to teach you more about mindfulness for better sleep. And I'll see you in some other course as well.


Vanessa Keranovic
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