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A Q&A with Kelly Boys on prayer
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Prayer vs. Mindfulness
Kelly Boys
Watching Now
Prayer vs. Mindfulness
Prayer vs. Mindfulness
Kelly Boys • 01:00

Both prayer and mindfulness are distinct activities that can be practiced in various ways, but they also share some similarities and contrasts. The act of prayer is generally based on religious or spiritual traditions and is typically considered a way to communicate with a higher power. It comprises expressing gratitude, requesting support, showing dedication, or requesting direction. Prayer frequently consists of rituals, spoken or silent expressions, and specific convictions or goals.

The mindfulness practice, however, focuses on impartial present-moment observation. It requires paying attention to one's thoughts, feelings, physical sensations, and environment consciously and without judgment or aversion. Although it has been incorporated into a wide range of spiritual and religious practices, secular mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) techniques are the foundation of mindfulness. The basic objective of mindfulness is to cultivate a condition of present-moment awareness, acceptance, and non-reactivity.

Even though they focus on distinct things, prayer, and mindfulness can support and enhance one another. For those who practice both, prayer can be viewed as a deliberate and focused conversation with a higher power, and mindfulness practice can serve as a foundation for cultivating the awareness and presence required for prayer. People who approach prayer with a calm and open attitude are better able to listen, reflect, and improve their relationship with God. Additionally, prayer can foster a sense of purpose, gratitude, and spiritual connection in a person. In the end, each method offers a different approach to developing inner calm, self-awareness, and a connection to something bigger than oneself.


View Transcript
[Kelly Boys, Mindfulness Trainer] - I would say prayer is a little bit different from mindfulness. Mindfulness is that process of non-judgmentally bringing attention to your experience in any given moment. And you can do that prayerfully, you can do that in a contemplative way that is similar to prayer. But I would say prayer is more relational. Prayer is connecting with God, and prayer is saying, I'm aware of what is in my experience mindfully, and I'm connecting with my relationship with God to interact with my life and to receive the grace that's here for me. And so mindfulness tends to be a self-directed process where you look at your experience and then prayer for me is that relational. It's totally relational, very relational with God or spirit.

Watching Now
Prayer vs. Mindfulness
Prayer vs. Mindfulness
Kelly Boys • 01:00

Both prayer and mindfulness are distinct activities that can be practiced in various ways, but they also share some similarities and contrasts. The act of prayer is generally based on religious or spiritual traditions and is typically considered a way to communicate with a higher power. It comprises expressing gratitude, requesting support, showing dedication, or requesting direction. Prayer frequently consists of rituals, spoken or silent expressions, and specific convictions or goals.

The mindfulness practice, however, focuses on impartial present-moment observation. It requires paying attention to one's thoughts, feelings, physical sensations, and environment consciously and without judgment or aversion. Although it has been incorporated into a wide range of spiritual and religious practices, secular mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) techniques are the foundation of mindfulness. The basic objective of mindfulness is to cultivate a condition of present-moment awareness, acceptance, and non-reactivity.

Even though they focus on distinct things, prayer, and mindfulness can support and enhance one another. For those who practice both, prayer can be viewed as a deliberate and focused conversation with a higher power, and mindfulness practice can serve as a foundation for cultivating the awareness and presence required for prayer. People who approach prayer with a calm and open attitude are better able to listen, reflect, and improve their relationship with God. Additionally, prayer can foster a sense of purpose, gratitude, and spiritual connection in a person. In the end, each method offers a different approach to developing inner calm, self-awareness, and a connection to something bigger than oneself.


View Transcript
[Kelly Boys, Mindfulness Trainer] - I would say prayer is a little bit different from mindfulness. Mindfulness is that process of non-judgmentally bringing attention to your experience in any given moment. And you can do that prayerfully, you can do that in a contemplative way that is similar to prayer. But I would say prayer is more relational. Prayer is connecting with God, and prayer is saying, I'm aware of what is in my experience mindfully, and I'm connecting with my relationship with God to interact with my life and to receive the grace that's here for me. And so mindfulness tends to be a self-directed process where you look at your experience and then prayer for me is that relational. It's totally relational, very relational with God or spirit.


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