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Find out why saying no can be Godly.
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Saying No: Part 1
Sade Jones
Watching Now
Saying No: Part 1
Saying No: Part 1
Sade Jones • 04:21

Our total well-being, including our spiritual path, depends on having healthy boundaries and learning to say no. We run the danger of running out of energy, jeopardizing our personal development, and disregarding our spiritual connection when we repeatedly say yes to others at the expense of our own needs and ideals. We may carve out time for self-care, self-preservation, and upholding our own ideals by establishing boundaries.

Saying no with self-love and respect may be a noble act. It empowers us to put our own physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual well-being first. By being open and honest about our flaws with ourselves and others, we foster honesty and integrity in our spiritual practice. Saying no frees us up to invest our time, energy, and resources in activities and relationships that support our spiritual growth and promote our sense of fulfillment as individuals.

Saying no outright and being firm with it may also be beneficial to others. When we establish clear boundaries, we provide other people with a starting point for understanding what they may expect from us. It promotes closer, more harmonious relationships built on mutual respect and understanding. Inspiring others to think about their own needs and boundaries by modeling healthy boundaries, we foster a culture of self-care and personal growth in our communities. The strength of saying no ultimately lies in our ability to make room for spiritual alignment, self-discovery, and the pursuit of our higher objectives.


View Transcript
Hi, my name is Sade Jones. I'm a wellness coach and a fitness instructor and I believe in God, period, full stop. I'm currently navigating my self-care in the spiritual world and I feel like as believers, we sometimes feel like we have to say yes to everyone and everything with a smile on our faces, because that's the godly way, right? I feel like we're like, how dare we say no to anyone who needs our advice or wants to go to lunch or wants us to take on an extra assignment or task at work or school or whatever it may be? There's this notion that saying yes is godly and it makes us better people. Well, I'm here to tell you, not necessarily. What about when we're exhausted or depleted or we just simply don't feel like doing something? Are we bad people? Are we not living up to the standard we're supposed to live up to? I wanna debunk that. I wanna work through that. I feel like saying no helps you establish healthy boundaries. It aids with self-preservation. It enables others to have clarity on what they can expect from you. So lately I've been saying no as a spiritual practice. I've been taking inventory of how I feel, if what's being asked of me is in alignment with where I'm currently at, and if I have the energy. So I wanna invite you to answer a few questions. You can grab something to write with, a journal, a pen, tablet, or you can just sit and think about it, whatever the vibe is. I'm excited about this. Also feel free to pause this and then press play and do all that stuff. So let's get into it. How often do you find yourself saying yes when you rather say no? Next question, what are the consequences of saying yes when you rather say no? Why does saying no feel so uncomfortable? And finally, describe what self-preservation means to you. Ponder this, do what you gotta do, and I'll talk to you in the next session.

Watching Now
Saying No: Part 1
Saying No: Part 1
Sade Jones • 04:21

Our total well-being, including our spiritual path, depends on having healthy boundaries and learning to say no. We run the danger of running out of energy, jeopardizing our personal development, and disregarding our spiritual connection when we repeatedly say yes to others at the expense of our own needs and ideals. We may carve out time for self-care, self-preservation, and upholding our own ideals by establishing boundaries.

Saying no with self-love and respect may be a noble act. It empowers us to put our own physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual well-being first. By being open and honest about our flaws with ourselves and others, we foster honesty and integrity in our spiritual practice. Saying no frees us up to invest our time, energy, and resources in activities and relationships that support our spiritual growth and promote our sense of fulfillment as individuals.

Saying no outright and being firm with it may also be beneficial to others. When we establish clear boundaries, we provide other people with a starting point for understanding what they may expect from us. It promotes closer, more harmonious relationships built on mutual respect and understanding. Inspiring others to think about their own needs and boundaries by modeling healthy boundaries, we foster a culture of self-care and personal growth in our communities. The strength of saying no ultimately lies in our ability to make room for spiritual alignment, self-discovery, and the pursuit of our higher objectives.


View Transcript
Hi, my name is Sade Jones. I'm a wellness coach and a fitness instructor and I believe in God, period, full stop. I'm currently navigating my self-care in the spiritual world and I feel like as believers, we sometimes feel like we have to say yes to everyone and everything with a smile on our faces, because that's the godly way, right? I feel like we're like, how dare we say no to anyone who needs our advice or wants to go to lunch or wants us to take on an extra assignment or task at work or school or whatever it may be? There's this notion that saying yes is godly and it makes us better people. Well, I'm here to tell you, not necessarily. What about when we're exhausted or depleted or we just simply don't feel like doing something? Are we bad people? Are we not living up to the standard we're supposed to live up to? I wanna debunk that. I wanna work through that. I feel like saying no helps you establish healthy boundaries. It aids with self-preservation. It enables others to have clarity on what they can expect from you. So lately I've been saying no as a spiritual practice. I've been taking inventory of how I feel, if what's being asked of me is in alignment with where I'm currently at, and if I have the energy. So I wanna invite you to answer a few questions. You can grab something to write with, a journal, a pen, tablet, or you can just sit and think about it, whatever the vibe is. I'm excited about this. Also feel free to pause this and then press play and do all that stuff. So let's get into it. How often do you find yourself saying yes when you rather say no? Next question, what are the consequences of saying yes when you rather say no? Why does saying no feel so uncomfortable? And finally, describe what self-preservation means to you. Ponder this, do what you gotta do, and I'll talk to you in the next session.


Sade Jones
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